Hi everyone! Today’s post is from my wonderful fiancé, Kevin, and his advice to all of the men simply trying to survive their girlfriend’s whole 30 experience. Enjoy!

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As a man, I have a difficult time understanding the complex theory known as a “diet.” Not diet in the broad since of what you eat, but the bizarre concept of surviving off of some short list of food that can only be found at Whole Foods. Organic free-range dehydrated pears just isn’t something I can relate to. That’s why when my fiancé started Whole30 for the first time two years ago, I asked her with deep love and sincerity, “so, what can you eat?”

To welcome in 2017, she decided to go for round three. With New Year’s Resolutions I’m sure I’m not alone in this trial by fire, so I feel it is my duty to help. Let me share a menu option with the men out there just trying to survive their significant other’s sugar withdrawals and chocolate cravings. Skip the restaurant and make your lady a “diet” meal worth the effort. Fire up the grill and be the hero with this man approved Whole30 recipe.

First, let’s layout the necessities:

2 filet mignon steaks (or your favorite meat of choice). Tip, keep an eye on your local supermarket ads. I was able to grab fresh cuts of filet for just $9.99/lb. at Harris Teeter compared to $18.99/lb. (or more), and most places run a different steak each week.

Seafood paring. Emma Kathryn is a fan of lobster tail, while I opted for a few shrimp to skewer.

Seasonings. I prefer to keep it simple, so salt, pepper, and some Old Bay is all you need. Less is more.

Veggies. I enjoy some french cut green beans, but anything green that grows above the ground is good (so I’ve heard).

Prep:

Let the steaks age overnight in your fridge if possible. If you’re just home from the butcher, let them sit at room temperature until you’re ready to grill to help them cook more evenly.

Take your kitchen sheers, or self defense knife, and cut down the middle of the under section of the lobster tail. Spread it open a bit. This will allow the lobster to cook well and expand.

Soak a wood skewer (we use these) in water, then impale the unsuspected crustaceans.

Drizzle the steaks, shrimp, and lobster tail with some EVOO (Extra Virgin Olive Oil – I learned that from Rachel Ray). Salt and pepper the steaks. Shake some Old Bay on the seafood items. Apply these items thoroughly and dutifully.

Grill:

For the green beans, put a 12” cast iron skillet (we really like this one)on medium heat. Generously salt and pepper them, and add more EVOO unless you have some bacon grease store up, then use bacon grease. Always use bacon grease. If you don’t have any, start a collection in an old coffee cup and keep it in your fridge.

This step won’t take much supervision, so just stir them occasionally and let the cast iron and bacon grease do the heavy lifting. They are done when you say they’re done, as I prefer mine with a solid crisp left in them.

Now on to the wildlife.

Heat your grill up to a medium-high temp. If you’re using charcoal, build up a nice even burning area. You don’t necessarily need anything fancy – we use this charcoal grill.

Add the steaks first, as they will most likely take the most time. Depending on the cut of meat and thickness, your desired time to temperature will vary. Use Google for that.

Tip: To get those fancy grill marks, let your steaks sear for a minute, then rotate them 90 degree once on that side. Repeat once you’ve flipped them and it adds a flair to your presentation. You’re welcome.

Next, add the lobster tail. That will take about 4-5 minutes on each side, but like everything, just keep an eye on it.

When you’re about 5 minutes out, add the shrimp skewer. They take around 2 minutes on each side, depending on the size of the shrimp. When they turn pink, they’re done. Oh, and don’t forget the grill marks here either.

Plate:

Line up the meal you’ve brought from the wild, added to a fire, and present it just as our cave-dwelling ancestors did, on some fine dining wear.

Now when she’s given up lattes and is looking to you for support, you can confidently say, “I’ve got this.”

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